Colorado Public Works Journal, Spring/Summer 2024

ACPA: Awards 2024 FEATURE: National Western COLUMNS: Association News PS: Out & About in Colorado SPRING/SUMMER 2024: Vol.20, No.3 - $4.95

2┃ Colorado Public Works Journal 1974 - 2024

The Colorado Public Works Journal - jo@coloradopublicworksjournal.com J O U R N A L THE EDITOR REMEMBER that Colorado Public Works Journal can now be read online, on your phone, tablet or other mobile device. Please go there, take a look and let us know what you think at coloradopublicworksjournal.com SPRING 2024┃3 Jo Taylor, Managing Editor Once again, I was fortunate to attend the World of Asphalt this year (thanks to my side hustle at Women of Asphalt Colorado) This show which covers 200,000 square feet, had more than 16,000 attendee this year. There were 500 booths and exhibits representing equipment manufacturers and service providers from all over the world, plus daily educational sessions led by experts in the industry. After my three days there, 60,000 + steps, listening to numerous product launches and enjoying countless networking opportunities, I learnt that the World of Asphalt had exceeded all expectations by becoming the largest show in their history. Take a glimpse of some of what I saw on page 55. At CPWJ it is our duty to recognize those who do great work in the infrastructure industry for our state. In this issue we are pleased to include the Excellence in Concrete Paving Awards presented by the ACPA Colorado/Wyoming Chapter on pages 21-37. We also have the Infrastructure Construction Excellence Awards (ICE) presented by the Colorado Contractors Association on pages 56 and we have included an in-depth feature on one of those ICE awards on pages 14-15. An interview with Amy Ford from the Denver Department of Transportation and Infrastructure, gives us the low-down on public safety which is their number one priority. See Industry Insights on page 16. Our Parting Shots Pages (PS) takes you as far a Nashville, Tennessee for the World of Asphalt show, but also local happenings such as Women in Construction week with events hosted by Propeller, Hensel Phelps and Mortenson. Concrete Day at the Capitol and other events that CPWJ are regularly guests at. If you would like to have us at your event, if you would like to advertise with us, or share a project or news on your business, service, or equipment, please reach out to me at jo@coloradopublicworksjournal.com or why not get to know our new recruit see page 10 and contact Monica at monica@coloradopublicworksjournal.com we would be happy to help you! Do you know that CPWJ reaches nearly 10,000 industry professionals across the state of Colorado? We are the only publication that serves the infrastructure industry, so if you work in it, you need to be in it. Join our community now!

4┃ Colorado Public Works Journal CONTENTS Cover Image: City of Boulder 2024 ACPA Awards- page 21 Photo: CDOT MAILING LIST MAINTENANCE Working from home and miss seeing your copy of CPWJ? No problem, send us your address and we will have your copy of CPWJ mailed to your home address rather than to your office.You may resume delivery to your office at any time. Please take a moment to let us know of any co-workers who may have moved on and no longer need to be on our mailing list. THANK YOU for helping us. SPRING/SUMMER 2024 : Volume 20 No. 3 COLORADO PUBLIC WORKS JOURNAL (ISSN 1555-8258) is published bimonthly in January, March, May, July, September and November CPWJ is published by PRIME Media, LLC, 5 White Birch, Littleton, CO 80127 coloradopublicworksjournal.com Managing Editor: Jo Taylor, (720) 360-6737 jo@coloradopublicworksjournal.com Volume 20. No.3, May 2024 Production: PRIME Media, LLC Design: Taylored Graphics Printed by: One Stop Printing Subscription, Mailing Services and Accounting info@coloradopublicworksjournal.com Subscription $30.00 per year in the USA Periodicals Postage Paid in Denver, Colorado. Postmaster: Send address changes to: PRIME Media LLC, 5 White Birch, Littleton, CO 80127. Contents copyright © 2024 by PRIME Media, LLC All rights reserved Colorado Public Works Journal is an independent publication designed to be of service and interest to those providing civil services related to infrastructure construction and maintenance and allied fields, including government officials, heavy/civil contractors, engineers and architects, distributors, dealers and manufacturers of equipment and materials, and providers of services to government agencies and the construction and development industry Colorado Public Works Journal accepts no responsibility or liability for the validity of information and articles supplied by contributors, vendors, advertisers or advertising agencies. Opinions expressed are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily represent the views of the publishers of CPWJ. 06 : Works News Equipment 07 : Works News Updates 10 : Works News People 14 : National Western National Western trail blazes by bringing out the best of us 16 : Industry Insights Amy Ford 21-37 : ACPA Awards Excellence in Concrete Pavement Awards 2024 42 : Association News APWA, ACEC, RTD, CDOT, CAPA, ACPA, CCA, CRMCA 54 : PS! (Parting Shots) Out and About at Events in Colorado 58 : Advertiers Index Our Corporate Partners ACPA: Awards 2024 FEATURE: COLUMNS: Association News PS: Out & About in Colorado SPRING/SUMMER 2024: Vol.20, No.3 - $4.95 ACPA CONCRETE PAVEMENT AWARDS 15-page special section as featured in Colorado Public Works Journal Spring/Summer 2024 The Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of ACPA Proudly Presents the 2024... “Excellence in Concrete Pavement Awards”

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃5

6┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Works News HAMM_Smart Compact soil_01 New compactors with Smart Compact With the 20 t and 25 t HC 200i C VA and HC 250i C VA compactors, Hamm is now offering machines that enable automatic compaction to a specified target value in earthworks. HAMM_Smart Compact soil_02 New drum for automated compaction: The compaction force in the newly developed VA drum from Hamm is continuously adjusted according to the project requirements on the basis of the precisely and continuously recorded Smart Compaction compaction value. E Q U I P M E N T Temporary Fence Available in Colorado Upgrade Your Security and Safety with Colorado Barricade’s Temporary Fence Solutions! When it comes to ensuring security for your construction zone or providing crowd control for a special event, look no further than Colorado Barricade. Colorado Barricade’s temporary fence rentals provide a reliable and convenient solution for your construction zone or special event. With Hassle-free installation, Colorado Barricade’s offer peace of mind without compromising on safety. Colorado Barricade offers standard temporary fence with the option for privacy screens as well as several styles of bike rack and crowd control barricades. To protect fencing from blowing over, Colorado Barricade can provide the standard options (sandbags and posts) and other options depending on your needs for wind protection. No matter the scope of your project, Colorado Barricade’s extensive range of fence options caters to all site requirements. Whether it’s screening and securing a construction site or managing crowds at an event, their temporary fence rental services have you covered. Choose Colorado Barricade for unparalleled security and peace of mind. With the Smart Compaction product family, Hamm has developed a range of solutions for smart and simple compaction. A further development that automates and simplifies compaction in earthworks and simultaneously improves quality and costefficiency has now been implemented in the new HC series models with VA drums. Following the successful launch of Smart Compact for asphalt construction at Bauma 2022, Hamm is now offering a corresponding solution for earthworks. Smart Compact for Earthworks – simple and precise Operators can quickly and easily learn how automatic compaction works, as all the compactor driver has to do in daily operations on the construction site is choose between an automatic mode and a manual mode. While the amplitude is automatically regulated by the machine control system in automatic mode, manual mode allows the compactor driver to choose any one of five preset amplitudes. The function is operated via the already familiar Easy Drive display. Clear advantages in practice The use of the new VA compactors brings various advantages for operators and construction contractors. For instance, the automatic compaction control not only ensures homogeneous compaction results, but also effectively prevents overcompaction or particle crushing at the same time. The VA compactors are therefore an attractive solution, as they make it easy for even inexperienced operators to achieve consistently high process reliability and quality. The cost-efficiency of Variable Amplitude Compactors from Hamm assure quality and process reliability construction projects is also improved through the fewer compaction passes required, the correspondingly lower diesel fuel consumption and the reduction of mechanical loads on the machine. The smaller number of passes required is naturally also accompanied by a corresponding reduction in CO2 emissions.

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃7 Works News U P D A T E S Since 1960, APWA has sponsored National Public Works Week. Across North America our more than 30,000 members in the United States and Canada use this week to energize and educate the public on the importance of the contribution of public works to their daily lives; planning, building, managing and operating the heart of our local communities and building the quality of life. “Advancing Quality of Life for All” is the theme for the 2024 National Public Works Week. Public Works contributes to advancing and enhancing our quality of life, no matter where we live in the world. Public works professionals provide essential services that lead to healthier, happier, more vibrant communities. APWA encourages public works agencies and professionals to take the opportunity to make their stories known in their communities. APWA offers resources to assist in the development and implementation of celebrations on the webpage:National Public Works Week (NPWW) - American Public Works Association (apwa.org) The APWA Colorado Chapter would like to salute and thank the thousands of public works professionals around the state who work tirelessly to provide, maintain and improve structures that assure a higher quality of life for our communities! National Public Works Week (NPWW), May19-25, 2024 APWA Spring Street Conference APWA Colorado held a successful Spring Street Conference in April. The annual event welcomed more than 180 attendees and 32 exhibitors. The professional development event had many great sessions and speakers including the keynote from Kirstie Ennis, adaptive adventure athlete and Marine Corps veteran who presented “Inspiration in Overcoming Adversity”. Other sessions addressed Pavement Preservation, GIS/Asset Management, Traffic Control, Public Works Response to Wildfires, Designing New Facilities, Asphalt and Concrete Paving Trends, Avalanche Mitigation, and Utilizing Waste Plastic in Asphalt. The annual tournaments for golf, cornhole and horseshoes are always a highlight and we had great weather for all of the events! The Annual State Backhoe Competition concluded the conference on Thursday with this year’s top two finishers, Jimmy Romero from Lake County and Colin Seaward, Town of Snowmass Village, receiving the opportunity to attend the National Backhoe Competition at PWX in Atlanta in September

8┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Works News U P D A T E S An Inaugural Day for the Women of Asphalt The first Women of Asphalt Day was held at the World of Asphalt 2024. This event was a resounding success, selling out completely. The attendees participated in a full day of engaging presentations, interactive sessions, and networking opportunities. It was truly inspiring to see so many members come together, demonstrating the strength and commitment to women in the asphalt industry. There are now 24 Branches of Women of Asphalt across 30 states throughout the U.S. and North America, Colorado being the first branch to be formed in 2019. Membership with Women of Asphalt is not only accessible but completely free, making it easier than ever for professionals across the country to join this powerful community. By registering, members gain access to an extensive network of like-minded individuals, informative resources, and exciting career development prospects. It’s an exceptional opportunity to connect, learn, and flourish in the asphalt industry. Whether you are an industry professional, a student aspiring to join the field, or simply passionate about supporting women in the industry, we warmly invite you to become a part of our thriving community. For more information, please visit our website womenofasphaltco.com or connect with us on LinkedIn, FB and Instagram. WZSSF Annual Poker Night On Friday, April 19, Colorado Barricade hosted its 7th annual Charity Poker and Cornhole event in support of the Colorado Contractors’ Association’s Work Zone Safety & Support Fund! This annual event is dedicated to promoting the safety and wellbeing of road workers across our communities by providing essential resources, training programs and equipment to ensure that those working in the industry have the tools and knowledge to stay safe on the job. Despite the rain and snow, it was a festive and successful evening with the biggest turnout to date! With the generous vendor sponsorships, ticket sales and poker re-buy ins, this year’s event raised a phenomenal amount of money with nearly $9,000 being donated directly to the Work Zone Safety and Support Fund; a 70% increase over last year!

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃9 Works News U P D A T E S On Wednesday, April 17th it was Go Orange Day of Work Zone Safety Week 2024 and the Colorado Contractors Association, American Traffic Safety Services Association’s Colorado Chapter, Colorado Asphalt Paving Association, and American Concrete Paving Association’s Colorado/Wyoming Chapter invited industry members to an event hosted at Kiewit Headquarters in Lone Tree to participate on two critical issues: Work Zone Safety and Traffic Control Workforce Development. The Work Zone Safety panel discussion brought together representatives from CDOT, FHWA and OSHA. The unique purpose and perspective of each of the panelists generated an interactive discussion with attendees. Topics that were discussed ranged from general best practices for anyone completing work zone traffic control to a new bill being introduced at the Colorado Legislature intended to hold drivers more accountable for unsafe driving practices while traveling through work zones. The consensus from the panelists and attendees was that there is significant improvement needed to ensure roadway users both acknowledge Bringing Work Zone Safety to the Forefront! and respect work zones with higher regard and when they do not that they are held accountable. The proposed legislation that was discussed would coordinate with multiple stakeholders to provide accountability measures meant deter unsafe habits in work zones. The Traffic Control Workforce Development panel discussion had representatives from CCA, CDOT, Colorado LTAP, and Front Range Community College. This panel focused on providing information about current initiatives and programs designed to enhance knowledge for those currently working in the industry and provide career pathway development for those entering the workforce. Attendees were excited to learn about opportunities to increase their industry intelligence and glad to know about the efforts to promote the great careers that exist in their field. Thanks goes out to all the event sponsors: Road Worx, Street Smart Rental, Ardent Traffic Services, Inc., Asphalt Specialties, Chato’s Concrete, LLC, Colorado 811, GCC of America, Arch Insurance, AWP Safety, Performance Equipment Rentals.

10┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Works News P E O P L E As we continue to grow our publishing business and take on other publications outside of CPWJ, it has been necessary to add to our team to support our readers and customers. Monica joined us in January as a Sales Administrator and has been busy getting systems in place to serve our customers and our audience. Originally from northeastern Montana, she first ventured into the world of entrepreneurship with a successful salon/spa operation. Seeking new horizons, she relocated to Denver and unexpectedly found herself in a General Management role for an artificial turf company. Through hard work and dedication, Monica eventually became a coowner before orchestrating a successful sale of the business. Outside of the professional realm, Monica has a deep passion for dogs and enjoys spending time with them whenever she can. On the weekends, you’ll often find her hitting the slopes to snowboard or honing her skills on a skateboard, always embracing the thrill of new challenges. Taylor Nichols joined CPWJ last year and has proved to be a valuable resource for us and our customers with her layout and design skills. Taylor has worked in the graphics world for over 22 years and has extensive experience in designing marketing materials and print publications. As a proud Colorado native, she enjoys working with local business owners helping them to create a strong visual presence they can be proud of. Away from her computer, you can find Taylor enjoying anything baseball. She is also a big family gal who is often running her two kiddos to baseball practice or theater rehearsal. Taylor and her husband also find time for fun dinners out and concerts in the park. Colorado Barricade is thrilled to welcome Allison Travers to the Colorado Barricade team as the company’s new Marketing Manager. With a wealth of experience in marketing strategy development and brand management, Allison brings a fresh perspective and innovative ideas to Colorado Barricade. Having previously spearheaded successful marketing campaigns in various industries, Allison is well-equipped to lead the marketing efforts at Colorado Barricade. Her expertise in digital marketing, content creation and customer engagement will play a pivotal role in elevating our brand presence and reaching new heights of success. ACEC Presidents past and present gathered at the 2024 ACEC Conference held in Westminster. From left to right: Dave DiFulvio, Bill Green, Elizabeth Stolfus, Nancy Clanton, Brandt Lahnert, Brad Doyle, Karlene Thomas and Gray Clark. Colorado Barricade Welcomes a New Marketing Manager! Sales Support for Prime Media LLC New Graphic Designer for Colorado Public Works Journal

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃11 RETHINK YOUR ASPHALT Micro crews Minimal lane closures No mixing, no tack No stockpile leaching ENDURANCE MEETS CONVENIENCE Discover the perfect balance of endurance and convenience with EZ Street Asphalt. Our engineered asphalt is designed to provide long-lasting performance while ooering the endurance of hot mix and convenience of cold mix. No matter the application, whether it is a pothole, overlay, or utility cut, EZ Street Asphalt is the reliable choice that exceeds expectations. YOUR INSIDE CONNECTION AVAILABLE IN 50 LB BAGS AND LOOSE BULK Meet CASI Asphalt & Concrete. Their bringing EZ Street all-temperature asphalt to your community. Give CASI a call to see for yourself. We can set up a demo, or send over a sample bag CASI ASPHALT & CONCRETE PERFORMANCE-PROVEN WORKS IN WATER THERMALLY RESILIENT Ambient ASPHALT TECHNOLOGY TM 3700 E. 56th Ave Commerce City, CO 80022 Phone: (303) 292-3434 coloradoasphalt.com

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SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃13 303.534.1231 | www.brannan1.com

Colorado is an experience. The sky, the sun, the crisp, clean air, and the warm, welcoming, rugged people all combine to make the idea of coming to Colorado for the first time a lifetime event many dream of, and few ever regret. At the heart of it all is a simple, quiet confidence that no matter what, Colorado people can get it done. This confidence comes from knowing that the doing will be up to people who call Colorado home. From the majestic peaks and glorious valleys to Colorado’s rich history of thoughtful planning, advanced infrastructure, ambitious architecture, and progressive social acceptance, perhaps nothing embodies what Colorado means better than the National Western Stock Show. Beginning with the 1874 Denver Blood Stock Association’s Blood Stock Fair, ranchers, farmers, businessmen, and bankers have gathered in the stockyards north of Denver to show cattle and commiserate while celebrating the new year with a few hearty rounds and maybe a tall tale or two. In January 1906, six nearly simultaneous meetings of various Livestock Associations planned to converge on the Denver stockyards in what would have been the largest such gathering anywhere in North America and perhaps the world. Wisley, with all the fanfare, planners decided to put a ring on it, and the National Western Stock Show was born. In 2024, the tradition is thriving, perhaps even better than ever at Denver’s newly reinvigorated National Western campus. “The stock show has been around for almost 120 years. It’s an annual happening that has been part of Denver life for far longer than any of us have been alive,” says Jesse Gross, a Project Manager with Ames Construction. A key player in the massive redevelopment program that has unfolded across the campus since 2015, Ames prides itself on being powered by the hardest working people in the heavy civil and industrial construction industry. It’s a hard claim to prove, but if the scopes of work Gross and his team went up against are any indication, it’s possible. “This program took a venue that was only used a few weeks of the year and transformed it into a year-round celebration of vital agricultural industries that serves many purposes.” In partnership with the Colorado State University System, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, and the National Western Stock Show Association, nearly a decade ago, the City and County of Denver set in motion a master plan that positions the campus as a global centralizer of agricultural science for the next century and beyond. For guys like Gross and the fellows bringing cattle and sheep over dry land for the last 120 years, getting it done is about accountability. “Ames operated as a prime subcontractor to Hensel Phelps who held an Integrated Contractor Program Manager contract with the City and County of Denver,” says Gross of the paperwork. Though Ames was hired through best-value selection, from the start Gross and everyone involved understood the project was going to be a massive undertaking with many unknowns. As one would expect flexibility, collaboration, and relentless determination were pushed to the limit on almost every task. “Our scope of work rolled out in five phases that began in 2019 and then struggled against COVID and the subsequent supply chain fallout to achieve a 2022 reopening. The first contract was to salvage and demo the existing stockyards. That meant clearing the cattle pens and salvaging all kinds of hardware, wood, and concrete. Then we installed a 78” Reinforced Concrete Pipe from the upstream portion of a regional drainage outfall.” Phase II work involved relocating the Denver Rock Island Railroad (DRIR) tracks running through the center of the National Western. DRIR’s original rail line which carried multiple trains per day bisected the campus. Ames built a rail bridge and at-grade crossings to relocate the central line east to an adjacent rail corridor, opening the center of the site up for the building pads and the new stockyards. Phase III involved building Bettie Cram Drive, which crosses the south section of the site from east to west. This entailed significant underground infrastructure for both storm sewer and sanitary sewer lines as well as delivering two pad-ready sites that now host CSU Spur’s Hydro and Terra buildings. “The fourth phase was the big one,” continues Gross before detailing a multi-dimensional scope of work that involved everything from the mundane to the magnificent. While tasks like installing in-ground utilities and building roads are standard, establishing an energy district and developing the highly innovative Delgany Interceptor are not. “We began by moving 350,000 yards of dirt and installing stormwater and sanitary sewers in the first package. The second package was to build the roadway along the western edge of the campus.” Heaven and Earth By Sean Vincent O’Keefe National Western trail blazes by bringing out the best of us.

The third package introduced a district approach to streamlining the campus’s energy consumption. Rather than each of the campus’ many buildings having heating and cooling as buildingspecific systems, a closed network of pipes circulates warm water from the Central Utility Plant (CUP) to all campus facilities simultaneously. A key cog in the process is the Delgany Sanitary Sewer Interceptor, an innovative renewable energy resource that harvests heat energy from the sanitary sewer. A wet well was installed where wastewater is pulled from the sewer main into the CUP where it is circulated through a biosolids separator. Heat is transferred to outbound clean water pipes serving the energy district to streamline energy consumption campuswide. “The fourth bid package involved paving about 20 acres of new stock yards with electrical and water supply integrated beneath the asphalt. New wash racks provide warm water for washing cows at dawn in January. The ranchers dry them using electric hair dryers to fluff up the cattle before they show them,” says Gross of perhaps the most amusing form of infrastructure ever considered – the cow salon. “The last package was 51st Avenue Bridge over the South Platte and a park on the east side of the river where we incorporated a collection of salvaged artifacts to share some of the site’s history with the public.” Asked about the challenges in executing all of this, Gross points to the intense scheduling complications of delivering these scopes through the pandemic and subsequent economic fallout. Not only was the work on the line but seemingly, so was the future of the stock show. “When COVID hit, Mayor Hancock canceled the 2021 Stock Show,” says Gross, of days and woes everyone remembers well enough on their own. “There was also a series of hurricanes, pricing went through the roof on almost everything, and the supply chain struggled in several ways. Meanwhile, with the 2021 show canceled, those vendors and dollars went to a show in Oklahoma. If we couldn’t get it open for the 2022 show, there was a possibility Denver could lose the event altogether. So, it was almost like moving heaven and earth to get this done in time.” Beyond the magnitude and importance, the site had a few typical concerns as well, beginning with the earth part of the equation. Given the site’s adjacency to the South Platte and quasi-industrial nature of more than a century during hardscrabble times, contaminated soils and high groundwater weren’t a surprise. “In some places, we were facing groundwater flows of up to 600 gallons a minute, which required a tremendous treatment chain to process,” says Gross. “Likewise, a significant amount of the site soils contained various contaminated materials and had to be hauled off.” In thinking ahead, the National Western’s new infrastructure accounts for the cows and cowboys with the same sort of forethought that brought the stock show together in the first place. “The new stockyards are designed so that when the yard is in use or being cleaned, the runoff is diverted to the sanitary sewer. When the yards are clean and empty that runoff goes into a detention pond and eventually to the South Platte River.” As the sun sets on another Denver day, the people of Colorado are back to getting it done, and the to-do list is full. The Western Stock Show Association Legacy Building is racing towards completion this year and more than two million square feet of new indoor and outdoor spaces are planned in the years to come. Asked what the most important thing he would want readers to know about all of this, Gross is succinct. “I go back to the first stock show in 1906,” concludes Gross. “Whether it’s Ames or anybody else, we can all take pride in being a part of something bigger than ourselves. That’s the Colorado way.”

16┃ Colorado Public Works Journal INDUSTRY INSIGHTS feature by Sean Vincent O’Keefe As the newly minted Executive Director of Transportation and Infrastructure (DOTI) for the City and County of Denver, Amy Ford has her sights set on making Denver an even better place to live. She took the job as steward of Denver’s built environment in January of 2024 and immediately homed in on the top priority – public safety. “DOTI is focused on increasing public mobility and safety while reducing congestion and fighting climate change,” says Ford of the stated mandate. “We are a large organizational body of some 1,500 employees. These people are working with between three and four hundred million dollars annually to manage and maintain some three to four billion dollars’ worth of public infrastructure across Denver. This includes roads, bridges, traffic apparatus, city-owned buildings, solid waste, recycling, and now, even the sidewalks. Along with Mayor Johnston, my biggest objective is to reduce the number of annual traffic fatalities that occur on Denver streets.” Research reveals that fatalities associated with vehicular accidents in Denver and across Colorado have increased annually since about 2010. Statewide, CDOT reported 407 fatal accidents in 2011. In 2023, Colorado reached an unfortunate all-time high of 699. In Denver, there are approximately 220 vehicle-involved accidents a day. By far, the number one cause is preventable driver negligence and speed. Aptly named Vision Zero, the new moniker quantifies Denver’s goal of zero traffic-related deaths or serious injuries by 2030. As of April 17, 2024, according to the tracker on the Denver.gov website, there have been 15 traffic-related deaths in Denver in 2024, the last occurring on April 10th. There were 83 fatalities in 2023. Denver and Ford have also been formalizing policies that prioritize people and safety in how the department designs, builds, and operates its transportation system. “In March, we formalized a policy that prioritizes people,” says Ford of a deliberate shift in Denver Moves Everyone stratification of mobilities. Recognizing that everyone is a pedestrian at some point during every trip regardless of mode of travel, the policy seeks to rebalance the transportation system to prioritize people walking or rolling first, followed by people biking or using micromobility, followed by freight, and finally, people driving. “This is a mode shift in how we think about automobiles compared to pedestrians, bicyclists, personal mobility, and public transit,” she continues. “Strategies like the bikeway arterial along South Broadway enhance equal access to the road in congested areas.” Asked what she would like the built environment’s many service providers to know about doing business with DOTI, Ford shares that expectations and benefits of Denver’s investments continue to increase. “I am looking for teammates who share Denver’s vision and values,” says Ford. “More than just collaboration, we need partnerships demonstrating strong commitments to equity, sustainability, and decarbonization. Of course, we want problem-solvers and topnotch expertise, but infrastructure is not just about design and construction. In 2024, good infrastructure development should also involve investing in small and diverse businesses, helping to mentor emerging companies, training young people, and generally uplifting others. Show us how you plan to do that.” Among design and construction programs, of course, the City and County of Denver has a few things going on. The reconstruction of 16th Street Mall is in progress and expected to extend in phases into the fall of 2025. Meanwhile, work is also ongoing along Morrison Road, where DOTI aims to make the streetscape safer, and more people oriented. The project will narrow the street, expand sidewalks and add pedestrian crossings, and add traffic calming, and landscape features to enhance safety and vibrance. Amy Ford l Executive Director, Department of Transportation and Infrastructure “Denver is a smart, dynamic, and still young city. The team at DOTI is devoted to making it better in every way we can.”

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃17 Looking forward, the docket for upcoming work at Denver.gov is full. Here too, the city-wide focus on safety and pedestrian prioritization is evident. Vision Zero roadway improvements in Q2 2024 include betterments to many key arterials including Evans, Federal Boulevard, Mississippi, Colfax, and the Iowa underpass. Undertakings in those areas range from new concrete median segments to pedestrian crossings and roadway enhancements to make room for users of all forms of mobility with a specific appreciation for the trend toward micro-mobility. Other noteworthy programs involving Denver landmarks include design and construction services for various tasks at Red Rocks, issued as an Integrated Contractor Program Manager (ICPM) program. The Ellie Caulkins Opera House will get an upgrade to the integrated titling system and new theater seating for the 2,188-seat performance hall. Denver will also seek preconstruction, engineering, and construction services for multiple mechanical projects on facilities throughout the city. “We had tremendous success in the recent reopening of the Colorado Convention Center,” continues Ford, who eagerly shines the light on many others. The Convention Center’s new rooftop expansion offering westward views in orange and blue will undoubtedly make Denver one of the most spectacular places to attend a convention worldwide. The new 80,000 SF ballroom is the largest in Colorado and includes 19 different divisions to accommodate thousands of configurations. Asked what challenges are on her desk today, Ford is frank. The City and County of Denver’s infrastructure responsibilities are expanding significantly. “In November of 2022, a citizen-led ballot initiative known as Denver Deserves Sidewalks was approved by voters,” says Ford. “This shifts the responsibility and expense of sidewalk construction, repair, and maintenance of Denver’s sidewalks from property owners to the City. So right now, we’re focused on implementing that program.” A lover of all things Colorado, like most, Ford appreciates the amazing weather, the easy-going vibe, and, of course, the majestic beauty that surrounds us all. Despite age and her husband’s disbelief, she still enjoys running full-court basketball and splashing jumpers at the recreation center with whoever has next. “Denver is a smart, dynamic, and still young city,” finishes Ford. “The team at DOTI is devoted to making it better in every way we can.”

18┃ Colorado Public Works Journal HOT SHOT SUPPLY CO. M/WBE, SBE, and DBE certified. www.hotshotsupplyco.com Hot Shot Supply is your expert in heavy highway construction materials supply. With over 25 years of combined experience in the storm drainage industry, Hot Shot Supply can aid in procurement of castings, pipe, outlet structures metals, grating, handrail, concrete material and much more! We specialize in stocking CDOT approved products for the concrete paving industry and heavy highway market. Hot Shot Supply has been supplying Colorado since 2010 and would love for you to join our team for your Heavy Highway, Concrete Paving and Infrastructure material needs. HEAVY HIGHWAY CONCRETE PAVING INFRASTRUCTURE CONSTRUCTION MATERIAL 5351 Lincoln Street, Denver, Colorado 80216 (720) 319-1150 COLORADO AND WYOMING

Ames Construction is powered by the hardest working people in the heavy civil and industrial construction industry. We lead with honesty and integrity, face down obstacles with persistence, and go where new opportunities take us. When Ames builds, you succeed. AmesConstruction.com

20┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Working in a Winter Wonderland September 25 - 27, 2024 Embassy Suites Loveland, CO Targeted Sessions and Speakers to Help You and Your Teams Solve Challenges. Winter Maintenance Supervisor Certification Workshop. Operator Training Program. National Snow Roadeo Competition. Exhibitors With the Latest Technology and Equipment. The Annual Blades Up Social. REGISTRATION OPENS IN JULY. Calling All Snow Managers, Fleet Technicians & Operators. Don’t Miss the Snow & Ice Conference! Details at www.WesternSnowandIce.com 6┃ The Road Ahead

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃21 ACPA CONCRETE PAVEMENT AWARDS 15-page special section as featured in Colorado Public Works Journal Spring/Summer 2024 The Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of ACPA Proudly Presents the 2024... “Excellence in Concrete Pavement Awards” ┃25

22┃ Colorado Public Works Journal The Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of ACPA Proudly Presents the 2024 Excellence In Concrete Pavement Awards Category: Divided Highways - Urban I-76 – York to Dahlia Reconstruction Owner: CDOT Region 1 Contractor: Flatiron Constructors, Inc. Design Engineer: CDOT Region 1 – Turnpike Residency Construction Management: CDOT Region 1 – I-25 North Metro Residency Construction Management: Kullman Engineering Group Category: State Roads US 287 – Park Street to Savage Avenue in Lamar Owner: CDOT Region 2 Contractor: Castle Rock Construction Company Design Engineer & Construction Management: CDOT Region 2 – Lamar Residency Category: Municipal Streets & Intersections (<30,000 SY) 30th Street & Colorado Avenue Protected Intersection and Underpass Owner: City of Boulder Design Engineer: Otak, Inc. Contractor: Concrete Works of Colorado Construction Management: Ground Engineering Category: Commercial Service & Military Airports - Colorado Denver International Airport Taxiway EE Owner: City & County of Denver – Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: Jviation, a Woolpert Company Contractor: Flatiron Constructors, Inc. Construction Management: Garver Category: Commercial Service & Military Airports - Wyoming Cheyenne Regional Airport Runway 9/27 Reconstruction – Phase 3 Owner: Cheyenne Regional Airport Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Design Engineer & Construction Management: Jacobs Category: Concrete Pavement Preservation - Airfields Denver International Airport Runway 17L/35R Pavement Rehabilitation & Electrical Upgrades Owner: City & County of Denver - Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: Jviation, a Woolpert Company Contractor: Millstone Weber Construction Management: V-1 Consulting Category: Concrete Pavement Preservation - Highways I-70 Rifle to Silt Concrete Pavement Rehabilitation Owner: CDOT Region 3 Design Engineer: CDOT Region 3 – Glenwood Springs Residency Contractor: Myers & Sons Construction Construction Management: AtkinsRéalis Category: Concrete Overlays - Parking Lots Denver International Airport East Economy Parking Lot Overlay Owner: City & County of Denver – Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: AtkinsRéalis Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Construction Management: DEN Landside Engineering Category: Concrete Overlays - Highways I-25 Academy South - Military Access, Mobility & Safety Improvement Project (MAMSIP) Owner: CDOT Region 2 Design Engineer: AECOM Prime Contractor: SEMA Construction, Inc. Paving Contractor: Castle Rock Construction Construction Management: CDOT Region 2 – Colorado Springs Residency Category: Industrial/Commercial Paving I-80 Winter Freight Improvements – Quealy Dome & Fort Steele Rest Area Design Engineer & Owner: WYDOT Design Engineer: HDR, Inc. Concrete Paving Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Construction Management: WYDOT District 1 – Rawlins Residency Congratulations to All the Award Winners! The Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of ACPA Proudly Presents the 2024 Excellence In Concrete Pavement Awards Category: Concrete Pavement Preservation - Highways I-70 Rifle to Silt Concrete Pavement Rehabilitation Owner: CDOT Region 3 Design Engineer: CDOT Region 3 – Glenwood Springs Residency Contractor: Myers & Sons Construction Construction Management: AtkinsRéalis Category: Concrete Overlays - Parking Lots Denver International Airport East Economy Parking Lot Overlay ner: City & County of Denver – Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: AtkinsRéalis Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Construction Mgmt: DEN Landside Engineering Category: Concrete Overlays - Highways I-25 Academy South - Military Access, Mobility & Safety Improvement Project (MAMSIP) Owner: CDOT Region 2 Design Engineer: AECOM Prime Contractor: SEMA Construction, Inc. Paving Contractor: Castle Rock Construction Construction Management: CDOT Region 2 – Colorado Springs Residency Category: Industrial/Commercial Paving I-80 Winter Freight Improvements – Quealy Dome & Fort Steele Rest Area Design Engineer & Owner: WYDOT Design Engineer: HDR, Inc. Concrete Paving Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Construction Management: WYDOT District 1 – Rawlins Residency Congratulations to All the Award Winners! The Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of ACPA Proudly Presents the 2024 Excellence In Concrete Pavement Awards Category: Concrete Pavement Preservation - Highways I-70 Rifle to Silt Concrete Pavement Rehabilitation Owner: CDOT Region 3 Design Engineer: CDOT Region 3 – Glenwood Springs Residency Contractor: Myers & Sons Construction Construction Management: AtkinsRéalis Category: Concrete Overlays - Parking Lots Denver International Airport East Economy Parking Lot Overlay Owner: City & County of Denver – Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: AtkinsRéalis Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Construction Mgmt: DEN Landside Engineering Category: Concrete Overlays - Highways I-25 Academy South - Military Access, Mobility & Safety Improvement Project (MAMSIP) Owner: CDOT Region 2 Design Engineer: AECOM Prime Contractor: SEMA Construction, Inc. Paving Contractor: Castle Rock Construction Construction Management: CDOT Region 2 – Colorado Springs Residency Category: Industrial/Commercial Paving I-80 Winter Freight Improvements – Quealy Dome & Fort Steele Rest Area Design Engineer & Owner: WYDOT Design Engineer: HDR, Inc. Concrete Paving Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Construction Management: WYDOT District 1 – Rawlins Residency Congratulations to All the Award Winners!

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃23 Category: Divided Highways-Urban Project: I-76 York to Dahlia Reconstruction Owner: CDOT Region 1 Contractor: Flatiron Constructors, Inc. Design Engineer: CDOT Region 1 – Turnpike Residency Construction Management: CDOT Region 1 – I-25 North Metro Residency Construction Management: Kullman Engineering Group The aging I-76 bridges over York Street were replaced with a single 175foot, four-lane structure. This project was at the crossing of three major thoroughfares in a congested part of Denver, requiring significant safety upgrades to the new bridge and surrounding roadways, including wider shoulders and a median barrier that reduces naighttime vehicle light glare. Working with CDOT, Flatiron completed the demolition of the existing bridges in under 17 hours (well ahead of schedule) with no safety issues or any major traffic delays. They paved nearly 70,000 SY of 10.5” doweled concrete pavement, with both day and night work. While all of the concrete paving is complete, additional work on the project is continuing and it is anticipated to be completed four months ahead of schedule, on budget, and with no lost time injuries by completing all work during favorable weather months.

24┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Category: State Roads Project: US 287 – Park Street to Savage Avenue in Lamar Owner: CDOT Region 2 Contractor: Castle Rock Construction Company Design Engineer & Construction Management: CDOT Region 2 – Lamar Residency The reconstruction of Main Street on the south side of Lamar included approximately 38,000 SY of 8.5” concrete pavement across 4 lanes of traffic. Work also included curb, gutter & sidewalk, installation of new lighting and median paving. With the large temperature swings that can occur in this environment, Castle Rock Construction Company needed to be prepared to protect any new concrete placements from the elements. They utilized an optimized Class P concrete mix that had been used on two past award-winning projects. Past success with this mix design gave CRCC and CDOT the confidence that a superior product was being provided. CRCC also was able to recycle the onsite concrete into a Class 6 base utilizing an onsite mobile crusher. CRCC had to use mindful strategies to complete reconstruction due to the large volume of traffic using the road and the local businesses and residences along Main Street. The project was broken into 4 phases that allowed for minimal traffic impact as well as optimal utilization of equipment and personnel

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃25 Category: Municipal Streets & Intersections (<30,000 SY) 30th Street and Colorado Avenue is one of the busiest intersections in Boulder. It connects the University of Colorado Boulder Main and East campuses and is an important travel corridor for the community. • 30,000 cars and 1,500 bicyclists and pedestrians travel through the intersection in a typical day. • 1,300 people board and exit RTD and CU buses using the four stops at this intersection. This is the first fully protected intersection in Boulder, and it physically separates people walking, biking, and rolling from vehicles up to and through the intersection. The existing transit stops were reconstructed and improved, and lighting, landscaping, art and other placemaking features were installed. The concrete pavement on this intersection provides a reflective surface to further increase visibility, reduce the urban heat island effect, and provide a long-lasting pavement surface. 30th Street & Colorado Avenue Protected Intersection and Underpass Owner: City of Boulder Design Engineer: Otak, Inc. Contractor: Concrete Works of Colorado Construction Management: Ground Engineering

26┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Category: Commercial Service & Military Airports-Colorado Project: Denver International Airport Taxiway EE Owner: City & County of Denver – Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: Jviation, a Woolpert Company Contractor: Flatiron Constructors, Inc. Construction Management: Garver

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃27 The new 4,500-linear-foot Taxiway EE at Denver International Airport, which connects to an existing high-speed taxiway, significantly enhances the efficiency and safety of aircraft movement between the gates and the runway. It marks the completion of the FAA’s largest safety project nationwide, addressing a previously designated “hot spot” with risks of collision and runway incursions. Despite facing additional scope, the team completed the project 21 days ahead of schedule. The construction team introduced innovative practices, including a “5 lane” system for processing lower select material and building variable thickness cement-treated permeable base (CTPB). Flatiron paved over 60,000 SY of 17” – 21” concrete pavement to complete the project. The new taxiway marks an important safety and efficiency milestone for DEN, and the opening of Taxiway EE was celebrated with a ribbon cutting by city and state leaders and national transportation representatives.

28┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Category: Commercial Service & Military Airports-Wyoming Project: Cheyenne Regional Airport Runway 9/27 Reconstruction – Phase 3 Owner: Cheyenne Regional Airport Contractor: WW Clyde – Great Plains Division Design Engineer & Construction Management: Jacobs

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30┃ Colorado Public Works Journal | KIEWIT.COM JOBS DONE WELL. Kiewit delivers large and small infrastructure projects all over Colorado with unparalleled quality. ACEC: Award Winners 2024 FEATURE: Team Sport FEATURE: ElevateCOS COLUMNS: Association News PS: Out & About in Colorado WINTER 2024: Vol.20, No.1 - $4.95 THE ROAD AHEAD: Best In Colorado Award Winners 2023 FEATURE: Xcel Energy COLUMNS: Association News PS: Out & About in Colorado SPRING 2024: Vol.20, No.2 - $4.95 Scan the QR code to get more information about subscribing to Colorado Public Works Journal. You can choose to receive a printed copy or read the publication online. Colorado Public Works Journal is published six times per year and reaches nearly 10,000 industry professionals across the state of Colorado. Enjoy The Journal Your Way! Inquiries? Contact: jo@coloradopublicworksjournal.com for more information. Print or Online

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32┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Category: Concrete Pavement Preservation - Airfields Denver International Airport Runway 17L/35R Pavement Rehabilitation & Electrical Upgrades Owner: City & County of Denver - Dept. of Aviation Design Engineer: Jviation, a Woolpert Company Contractor: Millstone Weber Construction Management: V-1 Consulting Runway 17L/35R and its connecting taxiways on the east side of the airfield were rehabilitated for this project, which included removal and replacement of 75,000 SY of airfield pavement, replacement of asphalt shoulders adjacent to new concrete paving, and concrete grooving on the runway and connecting high-speed taxiways. High velocity impact friction treatment was completed on the runway, the electrical fixtures were upgraded to LED, and directional signage was replaced. Taking one of the runways at DEN out of service for an extended period poses a significant impact to daily airport operations, and the rehabilitation of this runway required extensive planning and a high level of communication and collaboration to ensure its completion on schedule and under budget. The rehabilitation of the runway will allow the airport to continue to operate safely and effectively as aircraft traffic increases for years to come.

SPRING/SUMMER 2024┃33 Category: Concrete Pavement Preservation - Highways I-70 Rifle to Silt Concrete Pavement Rehabilitation Owner: CDOT Region 3 Design Engineer: CDOT Region 3 – Glenwood Springs Residency Contractor: Myers & Sons Construction Construction Management: AtkinsRéalis The I-70 Slab Replacement Project, located along I-70 from Rifle to Silt, was a rehabilitation project to restore safety and rideability on a stretch of interstate highway that is nearly 50 years old. The roadway was originally paved with 8” of concrete pavement with variable and skewed joint spacing over cementtreated base. The low unit pricing on the project allowed CDOT to increase the quantity of panel replacement by 1,000 SY and complete bridge settlement safety corrections. Overall, the team replaced 600 concrete slabs, added doweled transverse joints in all slabs longer than 15’ to reduce transverse cracking, and ground 100,000 SY of concrete pavement. Other work included rumble strips, guardrail upgrades and bridge deck overlays with polyester concrete. Lane closures were restricted to one lane in each direction during construction activities. The project was completed on time and under budget in the fall of 2023 at a cost of $10.4 million and provides additional life for this half-century old pavement.

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