Colorado Public Works Journal, Spring 2024

52┃ Colorado Public Works Journal Sarah Dalton is a Pavement Engineer with ACPA, Colorado/Wyoming Chapter and can be reached at sdalton@pavement.com ACPA COLORADO/WYOMING CHAPTER Sarah Dalton Pavement Preservation: New Specifications Concrete pavements are known for their longevity. Preservation projects, when performed at the correct time, are cost effective and can greatly increase that longevity. When the Town of Castle Rock originally invested in concrete pavement on Meadows Boulevard in 1985, they expected it to last for at least the 20-year design life. What they may not have anticipated is that it would not receive its first preservation treatment until 2018, 33 years after it was paved. Fortunately, this level of performance is not an anomaly, and concrete pavements all over Colorado are exceeding their design lives. While concrete pavement does not require as much maintenance as other materials, it does require preservation and maintenance activities to maximize its ability to serve the public. When scoping preservation projects, many engineers jump straight to replacing pavement with any distress present. There are numerous other treatment options that can be more cost effective and quicker to perform. Depending on the distress, panel replacements may do more harm to the pavement in the long term than other treatments. The National Concrete Pavement Technology Center released a comprehensive guide for Concrete Pavement Distress Assessments and Solutions which can be accessed at www.cptechcenter.org. Guide for Concrete Pavement Distress Assessment and Solutions (2018) To help agencies evaluate and specify the proper treatment for aging pavements the Municipal Government Pavement Engineers Council (MGPEC) published a new specification: Item 33- PCCP Repair, Preservation, and Rehabilitation. This specification is available at www.mgpec.org/mgpec-specifications. This specification has been written to give agencies and engineers guidance on what treatments are available, when each one is appropriate, and specifies materials and methods which have been proven to work in the Colorado climate. ACPA staff is available to assist with all facets of pavement preservation projects, from site visits for distress analysis and scoping, to training staff and assisting with construction challenges. ACPA also provides free lunch and learns on all concrete pavement topics, including preservation. Reach out to Sarah Dalton at SDalton@pavement.com to learn more. Meadows Boulevard near N. Diamondleaf Drive in Castle Rock, CO in 2022 (37 years old) Guide for Concrete Pavement Distress Assessment and Solutions (2018)

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